Checklists > Job Descriptions

If you’re really serious about recruiting volunteers, you have probably created job descriptions for available volunteer positions. Specificity always trumps generalities. We can recruit people to work in the children’s ministry, but people tend to use their own imagination of what that might look like and opt out of what they sense to be a coming disaster. We’ll always be more successful when we recruit to a specific role. People want to feel good about making a difference, but what the really want to know is what it is they will be doing… specifically. This is where job descriptions...

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Breaking Ministry Down

Some things never change. Fifty years ago, the job of kidmin was to lead kids to know Jesus. That is true of our job today and will be true of our job in another 50 years. Comparing other aspects of kidmin from today to yesteryear is very interesting (sometimes even funny). Just about everything has changed. EVERYTHING! The “job” of leading kids to know Jesus has grown in immeasurable ways in the last decade alone. Things such as: growing complexity of programming and events increased safety & security protocols expanding ministries and churches The “job” has become significantly more complex. Where someone...

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Facing Extinction

Here’s something to think about. Progress usually leads to innovation. Innovation then leads to complexity. With complexity then comes a revision of systems. Inevitably, the revision of systems leads to the elimination of things that are no longer necessary or helpful. Therefore, innovation leads to extinction. I remember the first time I flew out of the airport of my hometown of Valdosta, GA. The ticketing agent warmly greeted me with his thick southern draw as he transferred my suitcase to a bin behind him. Twenty minutes later, I looked out the window and actually saw the same man driving...

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Human Error: Ineptitude

Human error is a reality we face in nearly every segment of life. Our drive through order is wrong. The pants we bought are the right size, but they don’t fit. The cashier gives us the wrong amount of change. The email doesn’t go out when it is supposed to. We forget about the meeting we scheduled two weeks ago. Human error happens to us and human error happens because of us. Human error can be broken down to two primary causes: ignorance and ineptitude. Ineptitude happens when when we have the correct knowledge or skills, we just apply it...

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Human Error: Ignorance

In Europe around 1847, there was a huge problem. 1 in 10 women giving birth in hospitals died. A 10% mortality rate is awfully high for something as commonplace as childbirth. There was a doctor who was determined to discover why so many women were dying. His investigation led to what might be the problem. The location of where women gave birth was adjacent to where surgical procedures were performed. Many doctors would perform surgery and then come examine the women in labor. It turns out that these European doctors rarely washed their hands between surgery and examinations. They were...

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How To Do My Job

I’m what you call a big dreamer. I’m the vision guy. I’m the one with his head in the clouds. The only problem with being the dreamer is that I forget things. Small things, but usually very important things. I’m not the detail guy. For many years, I would justify my forgetfulness by saying, “I’m just not good at that, sorry.” I had to rely on people that could remember  all the details that I couldn’t. Like, buying 400 hotdog buns for an event Like refilling the paper in the printer Like sending reminder emails on a consistent basis (Seriously, I needed...

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It’s Not Complicated

Sometimes we tend to over-complicate things. We over-think solutions. When something doesn’t work, we are tempted to make sweeping changes and re-think everything. Sometimes, the solution is really simple. So simple it is often overlooked. The difference between overwhelming success and glorious failure could depend on a slight modification. In October 1935, the US Army Air Corps had aircraft manufacturers compete to build the “next-generation long-range bomber.” Boeing’s design had the lead; everyone thought the flight trials would be just a formality. But, minutes after its smooth takeoff, the giant four-engine Model 299 stalled and “crashed in a fiery...

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The Checklist

About four years ago, I had my first traffic accident. The accident wasn’t even my fault. I was rear-ended coming out of a Walgreens. As I pulled into a parking lot, my mind was scrambling. No one was hurt. Check. Wait, what was it that I was supposed to do next? Get name, phone number and address Get license plate and make/model and color of the car Get insurance information Take picture of damage The person didn’t have her drivers license, but I got to take a picture of her military ID. When I called the insurance company later, it...

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Think Outside the Event

I love a good event. I mean, really. Like many churches, my church does a fall event every year. Two years ago, I led an event after church on Sunday and I would initially consider it a win. People gathered in community outside the normal Sunday experience. However, there was something missing. Most of the people who attended were familiar faces. Apparently, not many people invited anyone. Not a win. Events are best when people invite people to come. When events have that vibe, “I’ve got to bring someone to this,” that’s when you know it’s going to be good. When planning events,...

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I Wish I Had Known: Mitch Royer

It’s been 10 years for me. Ten years serving in in kidmin. I’m actually surprised I made it this far. Kidmin wasn’t part of my plans. It was more of a stepping stone. I wanted to work at a church – so I jumped at the opportunity. I wanted to change the world, who knew that I would fall in love with children’s ministry. Obviously, there are a lot of things you don’t know when you start something new. My list of unknowns was very large. It took time discovering what I should do and shouldn’t do, often learning...

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