Author: Mitch Royer

Human Error: Ignorance

In Europe around 1847, there was a huge problem. 1 in 10 women giving birth in hospitals died. A 10% mortality rate is awfully high for something as commonplace as childbirth. There was a doctor who was determined to discover why so many women were dying. His investigation led to what might be the problem. The location of where women gave birth was adjacent to where surgical procedures were performed. Many doctors would perform surgery and then come examine the women in labor. It turns out that these European doctors rarely washed their hands between surgery and examinations. They were...

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How To Do My Job

I’m what you call a big dreamer. I’m the vision guy. I’m the one with his head in the clouds. The only problem with being the dreamer is that I forget things. Small things, but usually very important things. I’m not the detail guy. For many years, I would justify my forgetfulness by saying, “I’m just not good at that, sorry.” I had to rely on people that could remember  all the details that I couldn’t. Like, buying 400 hotdog buns for an event Like refilling the paper in the printer Like sending reminder emails on a consistent basis (Seriously, I needed...

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Think Outside the Event

I love a good event. I mean, really. Like many churches, my church does a fall event every year. Two years ago, I led an event after church on Sunday and I would initially consider it a win. People gathered in community outside the normal Sunday experience. However, there was something missing. Most of the people who attended were familiar faces. Apparently, not many people invited anyone. Not a win. Events are best when people invite people to come. When events have that vibe, “I’ve got to bring someone to this,” that’s when you know it’s going to be good. When planning events,...

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I Wish I Had Known: Mitch Royer

It’s been 10 years for me. Ten years serving in in kidmin. I’m actually surprised I made it this far. Kidmin wasn’t part of my plans. It was more of a stepping stone. I wanted to work at a church – so I jumped at the opportunity. I wanted to change the world, who knew that I would fall in love with children’s ministry. Obviously, there are a lot of things you don’t know when you start something new. My list of unknowns was very large. It took time discovering what I should do and shouldn’t do, often learning...

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Book Club: Raising an Original

I was recently handed an advanced reading copy of a parenting book called, Raising an Original, by Julie Lyles Carr. Julie is a remarkable woman. She’s a mother of 8 kids (the original Octo-Mom), leads a non-profit, home schools her kids, serves as the women’s pastor at her church, speaks all over the United States, and makes sure her kids are where they need to be when they need to be there. I was intrigued because I’m actually quite amazed by this woman. No one has enough time and somehow she’s doing far more than I am with excellence...

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Weekend Evaluation FTW!

Working in children’s ministry for 10 years, I have learned many things through trial and error. I read once from the Kidmin guru, Jim Wideman, that we need to learn from experience. Interestingly, that experience does not always have to be our own. Actually, if we can learn from others experience, it will save us a lot of headaches and heartaches.  Over the years, I have discovered the greatest need in kidmin is to step back and evaluate every aspect of your ministry. What does my signage communicate? How clearly and effectively do my teachers teach? How is the service flow in one...

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Favorite Things: Backstage Space

This is one thing that all kidmin leaders envy. We all look at with jealousy in our eyes. It’s something that never seems to be a priority in most building projects. Some call it a resource room, some call it a storage space and others call it a backstage area. Regardless, of what it’s called, every kidmin leader want a great one. One of my favorite things at LifeAustin is our kid’s backstage storage space. When my church designed the kids space about 5 years ago, the designers made the storage space for kid’s ministry a huge priority (crazy, right?). So...

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Rethinking Volunteer Training

I was giving a tour of our children’s area to a local children’s pastor recently, and he asked me a question. A question I’ve been asked hundreds of times by children’s leaders. He asked, “How often do you do trainings for your volunteers?” My answer in the past has always been, “Quarterly. I have a lunch and training with my volunteers every three months.” Unfortunately, only about 40% of my team shows up and I never feel like it accomplished what I was hoping it would. I usually take 40 minutes to talk to my team about the new policies or...

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Promotion Sunday: Small is the New Big

A few years ago, I had the opportunity to sit down with Larry Osborne, author of Sticky Church and Sticky Teams.  Larry is a brilliant thinker and innovator when it comes to how to make people stick in your ministry. Larry asked the group early into our trip, “What if success and failure was measured not by how many kids, students, or adults attended, but by how many stick when they transition into the next ministry?” He clarified, “If you have 20 – 5th graders moving into 6th grade, and only 5 are involved in student ministry after you...

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Live at Orange: Making Portable Great

Orange Conference is one of my favorite times of year. Meeting up with old friends, learning about new ministry ideas and initiatives, and best of all, growing. I pick each break out with a specific purpose, and plan for how it will impact the Ministry. Because my church is looking to launch multisite campuses, I thought it would be a good idea to sit through a session with Shawn Wood and Robbie Foreman called, “Making Portable Great”. Most of my church experience has been in a portable church setting, but making it great has never been my outcome. This...

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